Tutorials

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Tutorial Examples

Tutorials show a user how to perform a specific task. Tools used in tutorials include:

  • Text
  • Screenshots
  • Photographs
  • Video
  • Screencast video
  • Printer friendly PDF

Styling adopted for these software tutorials follows the guidelines in the Microsoft Manual of Style.

There are many different ways to provide help for software applications. This page provides samples of tutorials that show how to complete a specific task in different software applications. 

Video tutorials with a voiceover are available on the video page.

Tutorial with images and text only

Tutorial with images and text plus a silent video overview

Tutorial with images and text plus a silent video overview

Tutorial video with voiceover, no text

Example 1

How to Use Image Stacking in Photoshop CS6

Image 1: One pompom in focus

What Is Focus Stacking?

Focus stacking is a photo editing technique that makes all parts of an image sharp. Normally when you take a close-up photo of a small object, only part of the image is in focus.

A blurred background can be beautiful, but there are times when the whole image needs to be in focus.  Full focus is important in product photography when you want to show your customers all the details of your products. 

In Image 1, only the pompom at the front of the image is in focus. In Image 2, all of the pompoms are in focus. These results were achieved by focus stacking four photos in Photoshop CS6.

Image 2: All pompoms in focus

Why is focusing on small objects so difficult? 

Camera lenses can only achieve sharp focus in one part of an image. The closer you get to an object, the smaller your area of focus will be. This is because of the physical structure of your lens. Using a digital camera with a macro lens can give you more control over how much of your photo is in focus, but you will still have limits on what you can achieve. Focus stacking overcomes these limitations. 

Image 3: Focus is moved in each image

How Does Focus Stacking Work?

Focus stacking combines multiple photographs of the same subject, but the point of focus is shifted slightly in each image. Software is used to merge the photos to produce one image where the entire subject is in focus.

Image 3  shows a series of photos where the point of focus is shifted in each image. These photos were merged to create Image 2. 

Step-By-Step Guide to Focus Stacking

This procedure can use a lot of memory on your computer. Close all programs that are not required before starting the stacking process.

Step 1: Bring image files into Photoshop

  • On the Main Menu, click File, and then point to Scripts, and then click Load Files into Stack
  • Click Browse, and then and navigate to the image files
Photoshop CS6 Load Layers Box
  • Click OK

Step 2: Align the images

  • On the right side of the window, select all image the layers
  • On the Main Menu, click Edit, and then click Auto Align Layers
Auto Align Layers Menu

Step 3: Blend the layers

  • Make sure of the images are still selected on the right side of the screen
  • On the Main Menu, click Edit , and then click Auto Blend Layers

Photoshop will automatically blend the layers. Depending on the number of images you are using, and the capacity of your computer, this process may take quite a while to run.

Once complete, the blended image will appear in the Image window:

Focus Stacked Image

Conclusion

Stacking images is a great solution when you are taking close up photographs and want the entire image to be in focus. If you are creating an image of a complex subject, you may need to take lots of images to achieve the result you want. The number of images you use is only limited by your patience and persistence.

Example 2

Photoshop CS6: Use Actions to Resize Multiple Images

This tutorial shows how to use Photoshop CS6 Actions to resize multiple images without opening each image separately. Follow the instructions below, or watch the YouTube video.

 

What is a Photoshop Action?

Actions are used to automate tasks that you perform regularly. This can make editing images much faster. Each step in the task is recorded and stored as an Action. An Action is executed with just a few clicks of your mouse. Actions can be used on a single image, or a batch of images. Photoshop saves the Action so you can use it again at any time in the future.

Instructions

Step 1: Place all images in one folder

  • All images to be resized must be in the same location

Step 2: Create a folder to hold your resized images

  • Make a new folder to store the resized images

Step 3: Open one image

  • Within Photoshop CS6, open one of the images that will be resized
  • On the main menu click File, and then click Open Alternatively, press Alt + O

Step 4: Open the Actions Window

You will now create an automatic Action to change the size of your images quickly.

  • On the main menu, click Window, and then click Actions. Alternatively, press Alt + F9 

Step 5: Create a New Action

In the Actions Window, click on the Create new action icon:

Photoshop Action Menu Step 1

Step 6: Create a Name For The Action 

  • In the Name field, type a name for your Action

HINT: Choose a name that describes what the Action does so it is easy to find the next time you want to use it

Step 7: Record your Action

This step will record all of the steps you use to complete the action.

  • Within the New Action window, click the Record button
  • Resize your image: On the main menu, click Image, and then click Image Size
  • Change the height and width to the required size
  • Click OK 

Step 8: Finish Recording

  • In the Actions dialog box, click the Stop Recording icon:
Photoshop Actions Window - Stop Recording

Step 9: Use The Action

Now you are ready to resize your batch of images using the Action you have just created.

  • On the main menu, click File,  then point to Automate, and then click Batch
  • Click Action, and then scroll to select the Action you created
Action Menu
  • In the Source field, click Choose
  • Select the folder where your full sized images have been stored
  • In the Destination field, click Choose
  • Select the folder where resized images will be stored
  • Click OK
  • Photoshop opens and adjusts each image in the batch
  • A window may appear asking you to set the quality of resized image. Set the image quality, and then click OK
Photoshop Batch Window

Step 10: Check your files

Use Windows Explorer to view the resized images:

Check files in Windows File Manager
Example 3

Adobe InDesign: How to Anchor An Object To Text

 When an object, such as an image, is placed in an InDesign document, the object can be anchored to text inside a text frame. This ensures that when changes are made to the text, or the text frame, the object will not need to be manually adjusted.

InDesign Click on the Zoom icon

Inline Objects

To include an object in the flow of a text frame, you need to make it an inline object. This will make the object move whenever the text is modified.

 

Move and anchor a new object inside text frame

  • Click on the image
  • A small blue square is present at the top of the object
  • Press and hold Shift, and then click on the blue square
  • Drag from the blue square into the text
  • Release the mouse button at the place where the image be anchored
  • An anchor icon will replace the blue box
InDesign Anchor Object Inside Text Frame
  • The image can be moved using the arrow buttons or mouse
  • If the text is changed, the object will flow with the text
  • When the text frame is moved, the image will move with it

Anchor an object already inside text frame

Use this method for images that have been moved inside the text but have not been anchored to the text.

  • Click on the Selection Tool
  • Click on the object
  • Right click, and then click Cut (or press Ctrl + X) to cut the object from the text frame
  • Click on the text tool, and then click inside the text frame where the object will be placed
  • With the text tool still selected, right click, and then click Paste (or press Ctrl + V). This will only work in text editing mode
  • When the text is changed, the object now flows with the text

Anchor an object positioned outside a text frame

An object can be anchored to text within a text frame, but the object can sit outside the text frame. If the text or text frame is moved, the image will move with it.

Move and anchor new object inside text frame
  • Click on the Selection Tool
  • Click on the object
  • A small blue square is present at the top of the object
  • Click on the blue square
  • Hold down the mouse button and drag into the text
  • Release the mouse at the place where the image will go

This will anchor the image to the side of the text.If the text frame or text is moved, the object will move with it.

Attach an object to side of text frame

An object can be anchored to text within a text frame, but the object can sit outside the text frame. If the text or text frame is moved, the image will move with it.

  • Click on the object
  • A small blue square is present at the top of the square
  • Click on the square and drag the square to the start of the text line. This will anchor the image to the text
Indesign Attach Object to Side of Text Frame
  • Click on the Selection Tool
  • Click on the object
  • A small blue square is present at the top of the object
  • Click on the blue square
  • Hold down the mouse button and drag into the text
  • Release the mouse at the place where the image will go

This will anchor the image to the side of the text.If the text frame or text is moved, the object will move with it.

When an image is anchored, a small anchor will appear in the square that was previously blue

InDesign Release Anchored Object

How To Remove An Anchor

  • Select the object
  • On the Main Menu, click Object, and then point to Anchored Object, and then click Release
Example 4

Video Tutorials

Below are two examples of software tutorials with a voiceover. More video examples can be found on the video page.